Home > Income Tax, Payroll, Statutory Compliance > Considering TDS on Other Income while calculating tax on salary – Part I

Considering TDS on Other Income while calculating tax on salary – Part I

Section 192 of the Income Tax Act allows employers to consider employees’ Other Income and TDS on Other Income while calculating tax on employee salary. The relevant excerpt from Section 192 is presented as follows. Click here to see the source.

[(2B) Where an assessee who receives any income chargeable under the head “Salaries” has, in addition, any income chargeable under any other head of income (not being a loss under any such head other than the loss under the head “Income from house property”) for the same financial year, he may send to the person responsible for making the payment referred to in sub-section (1) the particulars of—(a)   such other income and of any tax deducted thereon under any other provision of this Chapter;

(b)   the loss, if any, under the head “Income from house property”,

in such form and verified in such manner as may be prescribed69, and thereupon the person responsible as aforesaid shall take—

(i)   such other income and tax, if any, deducted thereon; and

(ii)   the loss, if any, under the head “Income from house property”,

also into account for the purposes of making the deduction under sub- section (1) :

Provided that this sub-section shall not in any case have the effect of reducing the tax deductible except where the loss under the head “Income from house property” has been taken into account, from income under the head “Salaries” below the amount that would be so deductible if the other income and the tax deducted thereon had not been taken into account.]

Payroll managers have to keep in mind the following conditions imposed by Section 192 while considering Other Income and TDS on Other Income.

1. The employee should submit a declaration under Rule 26B with details of Other Income and TDS on Other Income, to the employer.
2. The employee cannot declare a loss under any “Other Income” other than “Income from House Property.”
3. The addition of TDS on Other Income should not reduce the tax deductible on salary.

The first two conditions are easy to understand. Let us take a look at the third condition by way of an example.

A male employee receives an annual taxable salary of Rs 200,000 after all deductions. As per the income tax rates prevailing for the financial year 2010-11, the total annual tax on salary, including Education Cess, is Rs 4,120. The employee has Other Income of Rs 200,000 and the TDS deducted on Other Income is Rs 40,000 (20% on Rs 200,000).

The total income including salary and Other Income is Rs 400,000 (Rs 200,000 plus Rs 200,000) for the year and the total tax on Rs 400,000 is Rs 24,720 for the year. Please note that the total tax including Education Cess (Rs 24,720) for the year is less than the TDS of Rs 40,000 deducted on Other Income. Just because the TDS on Other Income is higher than the total annual tax, the employer cannot ignore deducting the tax on salary.

According to Section 192, the TDS on Other Income should not have the effect of reducing the tax deductible under the head “Salaries” except where the loss under the head “Income from house property” has been taken into account, and hence the employer will have to deduct Rs 4,120 as TDS on salary.

Payroll managers can consider TDS on Other Income for the sake of calculating tax on salary. However, from the point of view of issuing Form 16 and filing Form 24Q, TDS on Other Income poses a problem to the employer. We will discuss that in the next post.

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  1. Parthasarathy
    April 22, 2010 at 9:37 am

    Thank you. Quite useful in refreshing ones memory.

  1. April 11, 2010 at 11:16 pm

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